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Town Views

Pateley Bridge

Accredited since: 2010

Yorkshire market town in Nidderdale AONB on Nidderdale Way and Six Dales Trail with an award winning high street (great butchers, tea shops, pubs, baker, etc). In the middle of the ‘Yorkshire Lake District’ and surrounded by great walks for all ages and abilities. Only 14 miles from Harrogate

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Wellington

Accredited since: 2010

Wellington is just north of the iconic Wrekin Hill in Shropshire. Although part of Telford it has its own identity as a market town (since 1244). Locally there is much of geological, archaeological and ecological interest. It has excellent transport links having a railway station and being just off the M54.

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Brampton

Accredited since: 2011

Brampton is a lively little Market Town built of red sandstone situated 10 miles East of Carlisle on the road towards Hexham and Newcastle.. Already popular with visitors from all directions, particularly with day trippers from the North East, Brampton is ideally situated for walking in the North Pennines AONB, Hadrian’s Wall Country, The Lake District and the Scottish Borders.

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Stocksbridge

Accredited since: 2011

Stocksbridge is situated, in the Upper Don Valley, some ten miles north of Sheffield City Centre. It is a small town which is part of the Stocksbridge and Upper Don Electoral Ward. The latter had a population of 18,496 (2012 census) giving Stocksbridge a population of ~11,000.

We are geographically isolated from neighbouring towns and cities, part of the Penistone and Stocksbridge Parliamentary Constituency. On the edge of the Peak District National Park, the town centre is in a valley surrounded by beautiful countryside. The area offers many easy, safe and pleasant walking options.

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Kington

Accredited since: 2011

Friendly and relaxed with a network of trails, medieval walled alleyways and intriguing buildings, Kington is a great place to explore and hang out. Boots and backpacks are commonplace and lying in the Welsh Marches, it has more long distance paths converging on a town of its size than anywhere else in the UK, including the Offa’s Dyke National Trail.
Walkers are most definitely welcome in Kington.

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Tregaron (Bro Tregaron)

Accredited since: 2011

Tregaron is a small, traditional Welsh market town in the upper reaches of the Teifi Valley, and nestling at the foot of the Cambrian Mountains. Its market was formally established by Royal Charter in 1292, and a thriving livestock market continues to the present day. Once famous as the last watering stop for the Drovers driving their stock across the Cambrian Mountains to markets in Herefordshire and further east, its current market continues on a more parochial basis. Historically the parish also supported a number of woollen mills, and became well known for the local manufacture of woollen socks. The parish church in Tregaron is dedicated to St. Caron, and its most famous son was Henry Richard (1812-1888), a founder member of the league of Nations and a lifelong advocate of peace. Of equal fame or notoriety was Twm Sion Cati, a local outlaw and highwayman turned politician, whose life is celebrated i local history and mythology.

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Much Wenlock

Accredited since: 2011

Much Wenlock is a beautiful medieval town, the birthplace of Dr William Penny Brookes, the inspiration for the modern Olympic Movement. A small town, it is popular with visitors who enjoy the traditional shops, architecture, history and the walks in the beautiful Shropshire countryside, including the magnificent Wenlock Edge escarpment.

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Bradford on Avon

Accredited since: 2011

Nestling in the beautiful Bristol Avon Valley on the edge of the Cotswolds AONB, Bradford on Avon is the perfect centre for a whole variety of walking. The Macmillan Way and Kennet and Avon Canal run through the town and the Bradford on Avon Walking Wheel provides countless opportunities to explore the area. You might also be tempted to join us for our Annual Walking Festival that takes place over the first weekend in September.

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Unst, Shetland

Accredited since: 2011

Unst is actually an island, the most northerly inhabited island in Shetland. It is approx. twelve miles long and five miles wide. There are three main settlements: Uyeasound to the south, Baltasound in the centre, which has three shops, and Haroldswick to the north. The population is approx. 650.

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Chepstow

Accredited since: 2012

Chepstow is a true border town located at the mouth of the River Wye. At its heart is Chepstow Castle, Britain’s oldest surviving stone fortification, and at different times the town has been Wales’s biggest port, the birthplace of tourism, a national shipyard, the location of the Severn Bridge and, more recently, the southern terminus of the Wales Coast Path. No less than 8 long-distance trails meet here, and Chepstow is an ideal base for walking the Wye Valley AONB, the Forest of Dean, the Vale of Usk and the Gwent Levels.

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Talgarth

Accredited since: 2012

Welcome to Talgarth at the foot of the Black Mountains in the eastern part of the Brecon Beacons National Park. Talgarth is an ideal base for visitors wishing to explore the area whether it’s the high peaks or the lush pastures of the Wye and the Usk valleys.

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St Dogmaels

Accredited since: 2012

St Dogmaels, at the edge of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, is on the Wales Coast Path and Pembrokeshire Coast Path.
The village centres on the ruins of the 12th century Abbey and visitor centre.
A mile North lies Poppit Sands blue flag beach with dunes, café and marshes

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Whitchurch, Shropshire

Accredited since: 2012

A border market town, surrounded by undulating countryside with over 110 km of public rights of way in the urban & rural parishes. There is a regular Makers Market once a month & a weekly local market , it is served by good transport systems to larger towns and cities. We have a yearly Walking Festival in May .

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Crickhowell

Accredited since: 2012

Crowned as the UK’s Best High Street, Crickhowell is an ideal base for exploring the surrounding area. Crickhowell is a small market town with a thriving High Street with independently owned and family-run shops where you’ll find a friendly, personal touch and plenty of local produce.

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Baildon

Accredited since: 2012

Baildon is a town on the edge of Bradford between the River Aire and Rombalds Moor. There are about 16,000 residents. There is a thriving centre with a number of successful small businesses. On the edge of open country, Baildon Moor is one of the first areas of open country heading out of Bradford. For many years the Moor and Shipley Glen have been destinations for walkers. A Dales Way connecting path, Bradford Millenium Way ,The Dales Highway, Yorkshire Heritage Way and Welcome Way come through Baildon.

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Denby Dale & District

Accredited since: 2012

The Denby Dale district includes the villages of Denby Dale itself; Birdsedge & High Flatts; Clayton West; Upper & Lower Cumberworth;
Upper & Lower Denby; Emley & Emley Moor; Scissett & Skelmanthorpe. An area of beautiful countryside, it has an excellent network of PRoWs – and a rich and fascinating heritage. Denby Dale train station is on the scenic Penistone Line and is the starting point for many of our walks.

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Keynsham

Accredited since: 2013

Market town midway between Bath and Bristol,

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New Mills

Accredited since: 2013

New Mills lies on the edge of the Peak District within the High Peak district of Derbyshire. The town is proud of its industrial heritage but is predominantly a rural parish. Our pride and joy is “The Torrs”, a sandstone gorge at the confluence of the rivers Goyt and Sett, featuring the iconic Millennium Walkway.

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Meltham

Accredited since: 2013

Meltham is a small town and civil parish within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England. It lies in the Holme Valley, below Wessenden Moor, four and a half miles south-west of Huddersfield on the edge of the Peak District National Park. It had a population of 9108 at the 2021 census. Meltham is surrounded by a network of public rights of way, including several waymarked and documented routes. It is 2.7 miles from the Pennine Way. Meltham centre is well supported by local shops, cafes and pubs and has free car parking.

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Snaith

Accredited since: 2013

SNAITH is a former market town having gained a charter from King Henry III in 1223. It was a very busy and important inland port until the 18th century. King Edward II built a Manor House nearby in the 1320’s and parliament sat here. The largest medieval royal deer park in England came right up to the edge of the town.

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